Primal Power Method Blog

The Natural Approach: Getting Acquainted With Holistic Medicine

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As I have aged (and hopefully gotten wiser) I have been gravitating towards a more holistic approach toward living. I try to use moreholistic medicine natural remedies to deal with my ailments as they arise. I must say, however, that by eating a healthier diet I do notice that these ailments occur less frequently than they used to in the past. I have found that in the face of continued increases in the cost of conventional medicine self care coupled with a holistic approach are becoming more popular and more accepted every day. In this essay I would like to describe  holistic medicine as it most definitely fits into a more natural lifestyle and the Primal Power Method paradigm.

Holistic medicine in various forms has been the ancestral approach to health care for millennia with its roots mainly found in the great ancient medical traditions of China and India.  Unfortunately for us in North America, we have ventured away from the holistic healing approach, as science and technology have become the

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Getting Back To The Basics Through The Power Of Walking

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The main excuse I constantly hear when it comes to not exercising is, “I don’t have the time; I’m just too busy.”  Over the years I Walkinghave challenged people that no matter how busy they think they are, I can find time for them in their schedule to get daily exercise.  In response, I will get the look of “Oh, sure. You just don’t understand my life.”  I hate to break it to folks who think they are the busiest person in the world and no one has a schedule as full as theirs: You are not the busiest person in the world, and your claim is just another poor excuse to avoid putting in the time to get some exercise.  As a person who regularly traveled 60 percent of the year,  including overseas travel required in a very mentally and physically challenging job, I still managed to find time to exercise. I’m afraid I don’t buy the “too busy” excuse for a second.

I like to tell people there is always one thing they can do every day to get exercise, and as a matter of fact they do it every day anyway, and that is walking!  The dumbfounded looks I get in response are priceless, but in today’s exercise-gimmick world this is just too simple a solution for people to believe or understand.  When it comes to walking you don’t have to purchase a gym membership, or some infomercial exercise DVD set, or outfit yourself with special exercise gear. You have all the tools you need to engage in this form of exercise right now for free.  What a deal! And after you read this article you can get right out of your chair and go do it, no training or expertise required.  It just doesn’t get any easier than that!

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Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Sufferer’s Story

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Childhood arthritis is the number one cause of acquired disability in children, and the sixth most common childhood disease rheumatoid arthritisfollowing asthma, congenital heart disease, cerebral palsy, diabetes, and epilepsy. It is estimated that 300,000 children in the U.S. suffer from some form of arthritis or rheumatic disease.

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is also called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA).  JRA is a form of arthritis that affects children 16 years old or younger and is the most prevalent type of arthritis affecting children today. The most common features of JRA are: joint inflammation, joint contracture (stiff, bent joint), joint damage and/or alteration or change in growth. Other symptoms include joint stiffness following rest or decreased activity level, which is also referred to as morning stiffness or gelling, and weakness in muscles and other soft tissues around the involved joints. JRA can affect internal organs as well.

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Getting The Point: The Benefits Of Acupuncture

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Acupuncture is one of the oldest healing practices in the world, dating back at least 3,000 years as one of the central modalities of acupuncturetraditional Chinese medicine.  In comparison, modern or Western medicine has been practiced for only about 200 years.

Acupuncture was first recorded in the  Huangdi Neijing (Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine), considered to be the oldest Chinese medical textbook, which most scholars believe was compiled between the third and first centuries BCE.  Traditional Chinese medicine, which encompasses many different practices, is rooted in the ancient philosophy of Taoism whose origins may be traced more than 5,000 years in the past. As part of traditional Chinese medicine, the main goal of acupuncture is to restore and maintain health through the stimulation of specific points on the body. Simply put, acupuncture involves the insertion of very fine needles on the body’s surface in order to influence physiological functioning of the body.  The most common practice of acupuncture is for the relief or treatment of moderate to severe pain, which can originate from various points in the body.

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The Holistic Approach: Doctor’s Of Osteopathic Medicine

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Most people have heard of or seen the initials D.O., but most do not know what they mean or understand the difference between a Holistic MedicineD.O. (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine) and M.D. (Medical Doctor).  Both are fully qualified doctors licensed to prescribe medication and perform surgery, both complete four years of medical education, both obtain medical education through internships, residencies, and fellowships, and both can practice in any specialty of medicine.

The biggest difference between a D.O. and an M.D. lies in their perception of the human organism and its health or lack thereof.  An M.D. has been trained to treat you for a specific symptom or illness, and views symptoms in disparate parts of the body as separate, largely unrelated disease states.  The D.O., on the other hand, is trained to view your body as an integrated whole as it relates to your health and wellbeing.  D.O.’s receive an additional 300-500 hours of training in the musculoskeletal system, which is the body’s interconnected system of muscles, bones, and nerves that makes up two thirds of your body mass.  This gives the D.O. knowledge and training to better understand how one part of your body can affect many other parts, thus finding the cause of illness, rather than merely treating the symptom or specific illness.  A good example of this would be the case of the narrowing of your nerve pathway in your lower back affecting your hips, knees, ankles, and even causing pain in your toes.  Most medical doctors would focus on the leg pain as a discrete event and likely prescribe painkillers and anti-inflammatories. A D.O. would focus on what is causing the leg pain.

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