Primal Power Method Blog

Getting Nourished: A Conversation With Author Sally Fallon

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1) What began your journey into traditional/holistic nutrition?

I’ve always liked to cook, but it all really started in the early 70s when I read Dr. Weston A. Price’s book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration.  I decided to apply the principles outlined in Price’s book to my own family, and raised my children on a rich diet that included whole raw milk, butter, cream, meat, seafood and organ meat’s.  The result was that none of my children needed braces, even though I myself wore braces as a child. And they were much healthier than I had been as a child. Then, seeing these good results I had the idea to write a cookbook that incorporated Dr. Price’s principles. I started what was to become Nourishing Traditions in 1990 and the first edition was published in 1996.

2) What is the Weston A. Price Foundation (WAPF) and how was it started?

The Weston A. Price Foundation is a nonprofit, tax-exempt charity founded in 1999 to disseminate the research of nutrition pioneer Dr. Weston Price, whose studies of isolated non-industrialized peoples established the parameters of human health and determined the optimum characteristics of human diets. Dr. Price’s research demonstrated that humans achieve perfect physical form and perfecthealth generation after generation only when they consume nutrient-dense whole foods and the vital fat-soluble activators found exclusively in animal fats. (As taken from the WAPF website)

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Giving Your Child A Head Start: The Importance Of Nutritional Imprinting

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Nutritional ImprintingWhether early diet influences long-term health or achievement is a key question in the study of nutrition. Such long-term consequences would invoke the concept of nutritional imprinting, which is a process that can stimulate or retard future development at a critical period of a child’s life. Research from small mammals and primates shows that early nutrition may have potentially important long-term effects, for example on blood lipids, plasma insulin, obesity, atherosclerosis, behavior, allergies, learning, and very importantly, on influencing a child’s palate for future food selection.

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The Natural Approach: Getting Acquainted With Holistic Medicine

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As I have aged (and hopefully gotten wiser) I have been gravitating towards a more holistic approach toward living. I try to use moreholistic medicine natural remedies to deal with my ailments as they arise. I must say, however, that by eating a healthier diet I do notice that these ailments occur less frequently than they used to in the past. I have found that in the face of continued increases in the cost of conventional medicine self care coupled with a holistic approach are becoming more popular and more accepted every day. In this essay I would like to describe  holistic medicine as it most definitely fits into a more natural lifestyle and the Primal Power Method paradigm.

Holistic medicine in various forms has been the ancestral approach to health care for millennia with its roots mainly found in the great ancient medical traditions of China and India.  Unfortunately for us in North America, we have ventured away from the holistic healing approach, as science and technology have become the

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Getting Back To The Basics Through The Power Of Walking

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The main excuse I constantly hear when it comes to not exercising is, “I don’t have the time; I’m just too busy.”  Over the years I Walkinghave challenged people that no matter how busy they think they are, I can find time for them in their schedule to get daily exercise.  In response, I will get the look of “Oh, sure. You just don’t understand my life.”  I hate to break it to folks who think they are the busiest person in the world and no one has a schedule as full as theirs: You are not the busiest person in the world, and your claim is just another poor excuse to avoid putting in the time to get some exercise.  As a person who regularly traveled 60 percent of the year,  including overseas travel required in a very mentally and physically challenging job, I still managed to find time to exercise. I’m afraid I don’t buy the “too busy” excuse for a second.

I like to tell people there is always one thing they can do every day to get exercise, and as a matter of fact they do it every day anyway, and that is walking!  The dumbfounded looks I get in response are priceless, but in today’s exercise-gimmick world this is just too simple a solution for people to believe or understand.  When it comes to walking you don’t have to purchase a gym membership, or some infomercial exercise DVD set, or outfit yourself with special exercise gear. You have all the tools you need to engage in this form of exercise right now for free.  What a deal! And after you read this article you can get right out of your chair and go do it, no training or expertise required.  It just doesn’t get any easier than that!

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Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Sufferer’s Story

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Childhood arthritis is the number one cause of acquired disability in children, and the sixth most common childhood disease rheumatoid arthritisfollowing asthma, congenital heart disease, cerebral palsy, diabetes, and epilepsy. It is estimated that 300,000 children in the U.S. suffer from some form of arthritis or rheumatic disease.

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is also called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA).  JRA is a form of arthritis that affects children 16 years old or younger and is the most prevalent type of arthritis affecting children today. The most common features of JRA are: joint inflammation, joint contracture (stiff, bent joint), joint damage and/or alteration or change in growth. Other symptoms include joint stiffness following rest or decreased activity level, which is also referred to as morning stiffness or gelling, and weakness in muscles and other soft tissues around the involved joints. JRA can affect internal organs as well.

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